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Queen’s University medical school in Kingston, Ontario incorporates historic houses

Queen’s University has inaugurated its School of Medicine with the symbolic laying of the cornerstone for the $77-million campus facility.

The four-storey, 125,000-<0x000A>square-foot building consolidates medical education in a single building and provides state-of-the-art facilities in an innovative learning environment.

“The classrooms, labs and study rooms are designed to facilitate teamwork and case-based learning,” said Donald Schmitt, principal at Diamond and Schmitt Architects, which undertook the project in joint venture with Shoalts & Zaback Architects of Kingston.

“The collaborative learning model positions Queen’s School of Medicine in the vanguard of a pedagogical revolution that is improving learning outcomes.”

The project was undertaken by a team that included construction manager M. Sullivan & Son Ltd., structural engineers Rooney Engineering Ltd., mechanical and electrical engineers H.H. Angus and Associates Ltd., civil engineers Josselyn Engineering Inc. and landscape architects DuToit Allsopp Hillier.

In addition to two 125-seat lecture theatres, 28 small meeting rooms and several videoconference rooms allow students to work together to solve clinical problems. A surgical skills and simulation lab is equipped with high-tech mannequins, observation rooms and recording facilities.

The school also houses an anatomy learning centre and museum and wet lab teaching and support space in addition to a ground floor lounge and common space.

Clad in limestone, the traditional building material used at Queen’s since the 1840s, the School of Medicine anchors a campus precinct. Medical school faculty offices in two renovated historic houses are structurally connected to the school and a walkway links with the neighbouring biosciences complex.

“This new building is much more than just state-of-the-art facilities,” said Queen’s principal Daniel Woolf. “With it comes a spirit of renewal and revitalization. We look towards positive change in the way we educate our health professionals and we expect Queen’s to be at the leading edge of emerging novel educational processes.”

Previously at Queen’s, Diamond and Schmitt designed the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Leggett Hall, Watts Hall, Leonard Hall and the Cancer Research Institute. It is currently at work on the reactor material testing laboratory.

From Daily Commercial News – http://dcnonl.com/article/id30375